[Reading] ➶ Nervous Conditions Author Tsitsi Dangarembga – Morefreeinfo.info

Nervous Conditions What I loved most about this book was the underlying story of coming to self and not so much to age In first person narrative, Tambu, a 14 year old Zimbabwean, speaks directly to the reader telling not only her story of growing up female in a patriarchal society, but also those of the women around her In the opening sentence, Tambu makes no apologies regarding her lack of emotion toward her brother s death Because with no other male children in the family, she is now the one afforded the oppo What I loved most about this book was the underlying story of coming to self and not so much to age In first person narrative, Tambu, a 14 year old Zimbabwean, speaks directly to the reader telling not only her story of growing up female in a patriarchal society, but also those of the women around her In the opening sentence, Tambu makes no apologies regarding her lack of emotion toward her brother s death Because with no other male children in the family, she is now the one afforded the opportunity of an education, a way to get off the homestead an escape.But with that opportunity comes conflict a divide in family, the community, and even within Tambu herself There is a constant struggle of loyalty Trying to maintain balance between the traditions of her own culture while also adjusting to those of the Anglicized missionary school How to better her station in life without coming across as better than This line is one that all of the female characters m This is one of those books I went into reading not knowing anything about it, other than Dangarembga is a Zimbabwean author I ve known about the book s existence for a while, have even picked it before but I have to admit the title itself has always prevented me from reading it There s not really a good reason for that But you know how sometimes you re drawn to a certain shirt because the color appeals to your eyes Or you re turned off It uses the old method popular among novelists of highlighting the prevalent social injustice and conditions through a shocking event you know how Medea s killing her children reflected on patriarchy of her time, when Beloved s heroine kills her child it reflected on slavery Camus Outsider s narrator failed to feel any grief for his mother s loss reflecting the way how people are unable to feel a sense of belonging to our surroundings and so on, Before I had read Phaedra I thought her inc It uses the old method popular among novelists of highlighting the prevalent social injustice and conditions through a shocking event you know how Medea s killing her children reflected on patriarchy of her time, when Beloved s heroine kills her child it reflected on slavery Camus Outsider s narrator failed to feel any grief for his mother s loss reflecting the way how people are unable to feel a sense of belonging to our surroundings and so on, Before I had read Phaedra I thought her incestual intentions reflected on the unjust assumption where a woman expected to remain happily married to a man twice her age and take a man her own age as her stepson Here the event disclosed in the very first sentence is narrator s then a little girl inability to feel any remorse on the accidental death of her brother and reflects on unequal treatment of girl and boy child.One of the first African feminist novels what at first seems like a coming of age novel of a girl in Zimbawe expands t We first meet Tambudzai, or Tambu as she iscommonly called, as she talks about her brother I was not sorry when my brother died Nor am I apologising for my callousness, my lack of feeling For it is not that at all I feel many things these days, muchthan I was able to feel in the days when I was young and my brother died, and there are reasons for thisthan the mere consequences of age p 1 From this opening, introducing us to thirteen year old Tambu, we enter the world of a We first meet Tambudzai, or Tambu as she iscommonly called, as she talks about her brother I was not sorry when my brother died Nor am I apologising for my callousness, my lack of feeling For it is not that at all I feel many things these days, muchthan I was able to feel in the days when I was young and my brother died, and there are reasons for thisthan the mere consequences of age p 1 From this opening, introducing us to thirteen year old Tambu, we enter the world of a young girl on the brink of becoming a young woman in a patriarchal African society of the late 1960s, not far removed from colonial times, where she and all of the women around her nervously await the decisions of the highest male in This book takes its title and epigraph from an introduction to The Wretched of the Earth, which I ve been reading slowly for several weeks It was really wonderful to read this, partly as an illustration of some of Fanon s ideas, andas a female perspective that answers and critiques Fanon s highly male centric account of the colonised subject.But forget every other book and every other author from the incendiary opening sentence to the fraught and nervous close, this story held me heart This book takes its title and epigraph from an introduction to The Wretched of the Earth, which I ve been reading slowly for several weeks It was really wonderful to read this, partly as an illustration of some of Fanon s ideas, andas a female perspective that answers and critiques Fanon s highly male centric account of the colonised subject.But forget every other book and every other author from the incendiary opening sentence to the fraught and nervous close, this story held me heart and soul 14 y This is the novel we have been waiting for, said Doris Lessing I am sure it will be a classic And it is it ranks on the ASC s Top 12 of 20th Century Africa What Lessing was waiting for was feminism, and to call this Things Fall Apart for girls is a simplification but it ll do if you need to describe it in five words.Like Achebe s classic, Nervous Conditions 1988, set in 1968 is about the conflux between African society and white interference Its two main characters narrator Tambu an This is the novel we have been waiting for, said Doris Lessing I am sure it will be a Holy fuck, this blew my mind I suppose what really got me was watching a young girl in an extremely male dominated world try to work her way through it to succeed in spite of a lot of adversity And to watch each of the women around her try to do so too What I really liked about the novel gets hit on in the author interview at the end, that there are no monsters in this book, each character does get to explain and be understood The author interview also mentions that Dangarembga finds race ha Holy fuck, this blew my mind I suppose what really got me was watching a young girl in an extremely male dominated world try to work her way through it to succeed in spite of a lot of adversity And to watch each of the women around her try to do so too What I really liked about the novel gets hit on in the author interview at the end, that there are no monsters in this book, each character does get to explain and be understood The author interview also m I wasn t going to read this book, because I already had one for Zimbabwe and thought it was just another coming of age story Then I read this critical essay, which made me sit up and pay attention And so I wound up reading the book, which is good, but oh, so depressing.I should say that the books I find depressing are somewhat idiosyncratic A lot of people have trouble reading about war and related atrocities, but those books rarely affect me much they re just too far beyond my realm of expe I wasn t going to read this book, because I already had one for Zimbabwe and thought it was just another coming of age story Then I read this critical essay, which made me sit up and pay attention And so I wound up reading the book, which is good, but oh, so depressing.I should say that the books I find depressing are somewhat idiosyncratic A lot of people have trouble reading about war and related atrocities, but those books rarely affect me much they re just too far beyond my realm of experience to evoke strong reactions But give me bureaucratic stupidity or, as here, oppressive societal structures ruining people s lives, and yikes That s awful How can people enjoy reading that So, this book It s about colonialism and patriarchy, butspecifically it Identity is a powerful concept But how does one establish such a thing Conventionally it develops from childhood due to an association with home and place But what happens if your home is changing What happen if you re taken away from that home Indeed, if you are forced to accept another culture s ways and customs, who is the you that is left What nationality do you become These are the question Tambu has to ask herself She s a young black girl living in a small, rural, improvised vill A Modern Classic In The African Literary Canon And Voted In The Top Ten Africa S 100 Best Books Of The 20th Century, This Novel Brings To The Politics Of Decolonization Theory The Energy Of Women S Rights An Extraordinarily Well Crafted Work, This Book Is A Work Of Vision Through Its Deft Negotiation Of Race, Class, Gender And Cultural Change, It Dramatizes The Nervousness Of The Postcolonial Conditions That Bedevil Us Still In Tambu And The Women Of Her Family, We African Women See Ourselves, Whether At Home Or Displaced, Doing Daily Battle With Our Changing World With A Mixture Of Tenacity, Bewilderment And Grace.


About the Author: Tsitsi Dangarembga

Spent part of her childhood in England She began her education there, but concluded her A levels in a missionary school back home, in the town of Mutare She later studied medicine at Cambridge University, but became homesick and returned home as Zimbabwe s black majority rule began in 1980.She took up psychology at the University of Zimbabwe, of whose drama group she was a member She also held Spent part of her childhood in England She began her education there, but concluded her A levels in a missionary school back home, in the town of Mutare She later studied medicine at Cambridge University, but became homesick and returned home as Zimbabwe s black majority rule began in 1980.She took up psychology at the University of Zimbabwe, of whose drama group she was a member She also held down a two year job as a copywriter at a marketing agency This early writing experience gave her an avenue for expression she wrote numerous plays, such as The Lost of the Soil, and then joined the theatre group Zambuko, and participated in the production of two plays, Katshaa and Mavambo.In 1985, Dangarembga published a short story in Sweden called The Letter In 1987, she also published the play She Does Not Weep in Harare At the age of twenty five, she had her first taste of success with her novel Nervous Conditions The first in English ever written by a black Zimbabwean woman, it won the African section of the Commonwealth Writers Prize in 1989 Asked about her subsequent prose drought, she explained, There have been two major reasons for my not having worked on prose since Nervous Conditions firstly, the novel was published only after I had turned to film as a medium secondly, Virginia Woolf s shrewd observation that a woman needs 500 and a room of her own in order to write is entirely valid Incidentally, I am moving and hope that, for the first time since Nervous Conditions, I shall have a room of my own I ll try to ignore the bit about 500 Dangarembga continued her education later in Berlin at the Deutsche Film und Fernseh Akademie, where she studied film direction and produced several film productions, including a documentary for German television She also made the film Everyone s Child, shown worldwide including at the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival


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